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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 356 (some duplicates have been removed)
discusses his book "syria: the fall of the house of assad". >> thank youpa so much fors spending part of your afternoon with us here. behal myseuld like to welcome you all on behalf of david lesch and myself. this is a wonderful session.our. we're so happy they your here.ss i wanted to introduce david lesch to you. he is a professor of middle east history at trinity university iy san antonio.nker a prolific writer and thinker ot the middle east and what is t' happening in the region.e it's a treat to have him here today. he has written his new bookyriat "syria: the fall of the house of assad", which i'm hoping you you sign all purchase debt and assigned. again and sign my copy first. he has met extensively witheadi president assad and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very impo
now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. >> are we better off in the middle east now than we were four years ago? absolutely not. why? because the policies of the administration and the way its been handling itself. >> when a president of the united states apologizes to religious fanatics while killing young americans, this is profoundly wrong. >> we would like to hold obama accountable for an absolute disastrous foreign policy. >> greta: president obama starting off the second term with a foreign policy crisis. four americans murdered in libya. the obama administration being hammered for the handling of the terror attack in benghazi. for weeks the administration claiming that the september 11th attacks were a response to a youtube video, same video that sparked violent protests around the world including outside the embassy in cairo. since the arab spring we have seen big changesn the volatile region. how will he handl
by the government on purpose. and today, in syria, where they are in year two of a very violent uprising, someone today in syria turned off the whole internet. the whole thing. for the whole country. all of a sudden. like a light switch. look at this graph. shows people using the internet in syria this morning. typing along. tweeting. whatever. and then, boom. lights out. no more internet in syria. somebody hit the off switch. here's another view. the internet in syria humming along, and then all of a sudden, nothing. syria has three cables that connect it to the rest of the world. as of about noon today, local time, this shows the traffic on those cables. all three cables just shut down instantly, off a cliff, nothing moving into syria, nothing flowing out. it's not like this has never happened before. syria has shut down the internet at times of military offensives in this uprising before. and we have seen other governments do this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months
the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wallpaper and it has since become more sophisticated and beginning to write articles, the editor is anonymous but they are starting to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being this kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity but
itself at that level to deal with the reactor in syria. the bush administration organized its iraq policy in another way. there are several models out there but it is important that i ran not be seen as one of 10 or 15 problems we have to deal with on a daily basis. iran is problem number one and will be for awhile. there are plenty of other problems in the middle east. first, syria -- i concur with everything dennis said. first of all, for the longest time, many people thought the fall of assad was inevitable so we would not have to do that much to provoke it. i'm not so sure, not because i don't think this insurgency is effected. i have been on the receiving end of a number of insurgencies in my career is. this is a very powerful and effective one. iran has command -- has committed -- syria has committed powerful friends that appear to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power, an iranian victory that will mark the good for our efforts to move iran to the negotiating table on nucl
clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers h
. >> thank you upon >> brown: and now to the conflict in syria. nato said today that it would consider a turkish request to deploy patriot missiles to protect itself from syrian attacks. turkey and syria share a 560 mile border and after syrian mortar rounds landed in turkish territory, concerns have risen that the civil war fighting could spread further. in margaret warner's latest report, she examines the spill-over that's already happening. >> reporter: nestled up against the border with syria, ceylanpinar, turkey has an all- too-up-close view of the civil war next door, as fighting rages in its syrian twin city of ras- al-ain. for days last week on the syrian side, president bashar al assad's forces fought rebels of the free syrian army, or f.s.a., to control ras-al-ain. terrified syrian civilians scrambled, some over razor wire, into ceylanpinar. the f.s.a. finally took over the syrian town, but not before badly fraying nerves in its turkish neighbor. turk abdulazziz guven said he'd had to rescue his cousins from the syrian side. >> ( translated ): the fight started at 3:00. at 7:
in tunisia and egypt, then we -- people saying well in places like syria, you have divided communities, divided societies, where in europe -- tunisia you have different groups. in egypt when they had the parliamentary election people assumed that there was prince reply -- support in groups. they did. they controlled most of the policies. well, wip a few months, what do we have? we have even though 46% turned out for that election, remarkably, and the muslim brotherhood has been good in turning out people. their candidates get only 1/4 of the vote. then if you have the final round , the two plrks it was so close we didn't know the results. so egypt is divided somewhat. the brotherhood after the parliamentary election, they have carte plan much, but they discovered they don't. they have been sending in pressure from the right. the writing of these institutions. today, as we speak, in tahrir square there are smowsu thousands of people demonstrating. going for essentially more specific reference to the sharia religious law in the constitution where there is a deal where more moderates are
's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation.
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
-- laura trevelyan. searching for a better life outside syria, some pretty gee's find themselves in limbo, now fighting for basic needs. is there life beyond earth? we will tell you about the frigid spider. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. for 60 -- six days in egypt, the protesters have been demanding the president to give up his sweeping powers. the judge's claim the new president is seeking bloody revenge. as both sides digging in, is there any end in sight? >> pensions are rising between president morsi and the egyptian judiciary. some protests over him giving himself extensive new powers. the spokesman says the president has joined in the campaign against the court. >> the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized by any threat or blackmail, and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone come on a matter how forcible the pressure. we are ready to face this, whatever the consequences. >> meanwhile, the final draft of egypt's new constitution is said to be on the verge of completion. in tahri
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
have their only naval base outside the former soviet union in syria. ladies and gentlemen, the russians are a very big part of this problem. i would not assume that the united states is the main issue here. if the russians and the chinese play ball on this, this could've been resolved a long time ago. but my sense is pessimistic. my sense, it's probably too late to put humpty dumpty of syria back together again. it has festered too long. all of this time that something could have been done, pretty much nothing was done except to make the situation worse. all of the talk in the united nations, and elsewhere, and the talk of a cease-fire, these are not solutions. this is talk. it's too late. it's too unclear. it's too fractious. how many in this room could name the opposition? how many in this room have a clear view of who the opposition is? or will be? on a danger to the united states, to the gcc and others? do we know this? are we going to hand weapons to them? i remember a reporter from "the wall street journal" asking me as the revolution was going on in libya, whose the opposition, d
are high and the deployment of israeli ground forces and syria now threatening the stability of the entire region. >> the situation is incredibly serious. there is a danger that is spreading and control throughout the region, and afraid to say. >> with that in mind, the german foreign minister left the talks prematurely to catch a flight to israel. what's the international monetary fund is urging european governments to take a loss on their holdings of greek government bonds. the imf says the the only way to make grease solvent. >> the move is unpopular in a number of countries, including germany. taking a loss on a greek debt, or a hair cut, is illegal. the director of the imf will be having a talk with eurozone finance ministers. "she came to the philippines to talk about the asian economy, but even in manila, christina guard was unable to escape the eurozone debt crisis -- cristina lagard could not escape the debr crisis. the greek debt is expected to spiral to nearly 180% by the end of this year. by next year, it could be pushing 190%. the head of the imf has suggested that greece may
or together you'll find ♪that we are two-oo-oo, oo-oo-oo, oo-oo-oo, of a kind♪ >>> syria's opposition is getting more organized. they've named an official coalition ambassador to france. it's a move seen as critical to garnering more international support for their battle against syrian president bashar al awes yad. the op sfwligs group says more than 250 people have been killed and fighting in syria over just the past couple of days. "new york times" columnist nicolas krzysztof just returned from an assignment in syria and cmn's randikay e asked him how civil war is affecting the people and the people of neighboring countries. >> the humanitarian situation is getting worse. you already have 2.5 million people who have been kicked out of their homes, and, you know, winter is coming, and just the stories are just so heart breaking, randi. first her home was destroyed by a bomb, and then her husband disappeared, maybe shot by a sniper or arrested. nobody knows. so now she's gone from, you know, this nice, normal, middle class existence like you or me to living in a tent with her kids as
of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events and an undertaking producing a series of transition issues on key issues, and research staff and by outsi
now in syria, damascus international airport shut down. flights in and out are canceled. fierce fighting closed off the main road to the airport. these clashes happening as the country's internet goes dark and cell phone communication drops out. it's harder to post videos like this one. reportedly showing shelling in aleppo uploaded earlier today. in the past, the syrian government cut off access in an operation. but this is unprecedented. the military jet and two helicopters were shot down by rebels. now, takeovers at military bases given them a new arsenal of heavy weaponry. in this attack, they used rockets and as cnn's arwa damon reports, the rebels claiming this as a major victory. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor made off with a sizable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares now a trophy of war. proudly shown off by this man. we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt any time they heard a jet overhea
. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that fighting intensifies much of syria's internet network has been cut. the government and opposition are blaming each other for the shutdown. whatever the truth, syria's regime is battling these men for its very survival. president assad's helicopters are being shot down. and even a mig jet was filmed tumbling from the sky. this rebel boasting that he's downed both a helicopter and a mig within 24 hours. these surface to air missiles
. >> there will be demonstrations in the streets tomorrow. we will be following that as well. joining me. or now to syria where the rebel- held area of the baskets claims that he -- of damascus claims that government forces bombed a playground full of children. the shell landed near a refugee camp where nearly 12,000 are living in awful conditions. >> atma camp, for 12,000 people this is as far away from the war they can get. it is wet and cold, even before the winter has really set in. sewage mixes with mud after it rains. for some, the temporary home has become permanent. they are stopped. this place sprung up overnight when people fleeing to turkey arrived at the border fence and could not go any further. the war in syria is binding on. in a typical week the the 1000 people are killed. many more families are making the same journey only to end up here. >> in northern syria has seen some of the worst atrocities of the war. they have come through a terrible ordeal to reach atma. in this group of tents, we found survivors of one area where 110 people are said to have died there. 145-year-old man lost four bro
in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
is likely to change and where do you think syria is headed at this moment, although we have shifted our focus to this conflict between israel and hamas? dennis? >> what are the options that present themselves? >> look, i think syria is .. headed to a failed state which is nobody's interest in the region, and i think the key at this point is, for us to find a way to do more. you will already seeing the effort to build a more credible opposition. >> rose: right. >> now i think what is needed is also to ensure that the balance of power within that opposition is one that doesn't favor the radical islamists instead it means finding a way to get material support both nonlethal and lethal assistance to those who are more secular, who are submitted to an inclusive future for syria, who are committed to, in fact, a much more democratic future for syria. i think it is almost inevitable that we and others internationally are going to do more to build up the opposition because the alternative is to see a failed state where the kind of conflict you see within syria more and more begins not only to
people across syria are dealing with a nationwide internet blackout and a top official at the united nations has harsh words about the deadly civil war which has stretched on for more than a year. the details are next. and powerful storms are smacking the west coast with heavy rain and winds. ♪ [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need? open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. so don't wait. now's the time to get on a path that could be right for you... with unitedhealthcare medicare solutions. call today to learn about the kinds of coverage we offer, including aarp medicarecomplete plans insured through unitedhealthcare. these medicare advantage plans can combine parts a and b, your hospital and doctor coverage... with part d prescription drug coverage, and extra benefits... all in one complete plan... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to cha
about this? you look what they did and the syria war, in which was they had in 2006, you never heard word one about it before they did it. why are they vocal about this? there's three reasons why they have been so vocal. one, it was designed to motivate the rest of the world, and i think, by the way, if you, you know, we know from our emphasis regarding the idea that the europeans would have adopted the sanctions they did like a boycott on iranian oil if they didn't they the alternative was they would strike voluntarily, and to think that would have happened without the israeli, quote, motivation," is not realistic. the second reason they do it is because they are getting the world ready not to be surprised. if diplomacy fails, and the third reason is to get the public ready. that reflecting their reality, but in answer to the question, we've, you know, you've -- we've not had conversations with others that i'm aware of that would deal with that, but i note for you that david cameron made statements saying, you know, also repeated the words "all options on the table," we want deploam
coming out of syria, video showing the aftermath of an air strike that purportedly hit a playground full of children. it comes as the assad regime launches a new wave of attacks across the country. we'll have an update from a photojournalist who just spent eight days inside syria straight ahead. ng this delicious could only come from nature. now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet be
was down today in syria and some traffic was halted at the airport in damascus as rebels battled government forces. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, margaret warner examines what the latest clashes tell us about the strength of the assad regime and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern danceo contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to
to universities. they focus on the violence and syria and the challenges each jet phases going forward. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i am bill clifford, president and ceo of world boston. as we head into the ultimate panel, assessing the aftermath of the arabs bring, please allow me to think todd culpeper, president and ceo of the world affairs council of america, his crack staff, national council chair, lori murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am awash in debt it is time to make good on those obligations to each year on the panel, who i'm honored to present. i have had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i am telling you a way overdue invitation to our counsel downtown. the professor is a senior fellow at the sovran center at brookings institution, a distinguished former adviser to my current adviser to many government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and a prolific and best-selling author let me quote from the top of his website at the university of maryland
for most of the past decade were syria and iran. the leadership was damascus. that got totally destroyed because hamas is part of the broader muslim brotherhood network in the middle east as morsi is one of the leaders of the egyptian muslim brotherhood so hamas the palestinian brotherhood and the muslim brotherhood in syria is the single biggest group in the political if not military opposition to assets so the relationship between hamas and syria is destroyed. the relationship between hamas and iran barely exists. iran does have ties to other smaller militant groups in gaza. >> jennifer: hussein are you saying -- >> does maintain some relations with hamas but they're not close. you're absolutely right though to point out that what all of this is doing to the p.a., the palestinian authority and the plo, western friendly and interested in peace agreement with israel, not interested in a fight to the death or armed struggle. they essentially have gotten into a very huge pickle over the past year because a year ago
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 356 (some duplicates have been removed)